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Brainstorming Sessions

 

2012PE1108
Brainstorming Session:

8 November, 2012

Topic:

Report on Assessing MA Students in the International Studies Programme

Speaker:

Riwayda Khawalda

Summary:

The Ibrahim Abu-Lughod Institute of International Studies held a brainstorming session during which Riwayda Khawalda, a former student in the program, discussed her report on assessing MA students in the international studies programme. The report was based on 86 interviews for International Studies alumni. The report consists of two parts: part one consists of a number of  questions which aim at gathering personal information regarding these students in order to renew communications with them. And the second part contains questions which assess the MA programme in International Studies, including what they thought of the institutes’ activities, their thoughts of the comprehensive exam, thesis and two seminars; in addition to the extent to which these graduate students have gained from the MA programme in their academic and professional life. The interviews also included asking graduate students about the two concentrations in the programme: the forced migration and refugees concentration, and the diplomacy concentration. Furthermore, these alumni students expressed their wish to join the IALIIS Alumni.

Output:

 


2012PE1022
Brainstorming Session:

October 22, 2012

Topic:

Neighboring countries legal obligations towards Syrian asylum seekers during the  Syrian Uprising

Speaker:

Hiba Saida

Summary:

During this brainstorming session, Hiba discussed her research proposal on Neighboring countries legal obligations towards Syrian asylum seekers during the Syrian Uprising. As she illustrated that Syrians are being displaced to neighboring countries, namely: Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey and Iraq in order to save their lives and attain the protection of these countries. Yet the governments of these neighboring countries consider that providing protection to these Syrian asylum seekers as essential humanitarian needs and as grants from states, rather than obligations enshrined under international refugee law and human rights law; which deprived refugees from gaining minimum rights such as legal protection that is provided through the implementation of customary law; including the principle non-refoulement.

Output:

 


 

2012PE1011
Brainstorming Session:

11 October, 2012

Topic:

An Analytical Study on the Healthcare of Palestinian Refugees

Speaker:

Said Salameh

Summary:

Mr. Said Salameh presented the latest research of the Department of Refugee Affairs regarding the health services which UNRWA provides to Palestinian Refugees. As he compared the  health needs of these refugees and whether these services comply with their needs. This research depends on the latest statistics, made inside and outside of these refugee camps, in terms of the number of refugees and the beneficiaries of these health services. Furthermore, he also mentioned the role of civil society, and national institutions in development and improving refugees health status.

Output:

 


 

2012PE1004
Brainstorming Session:

October 4th, 2012

Topic:

Transnational Justice

Speaker:

Jumana Abu-Oxa

Summary:

During this brainstorming Jumana Abu-Oxa discussed transnational justice, which refers to the set of judicial and non-judicial measures that have been implemented by different countries in order to redress the legacies of massive human rights abuses. She also noted that Transitional justice is not a 'special’ kind of justice, but an approach to achieve justice in times of transition from conflict and/or state repression. Moreover, she referred to the elements of a comprehensive transitional justice policy which are: criminal prosecutions, reparations, institutional reform, and truth commissions.

Output:

 


 

2012PE0524
Brainstorming Session:

May 242012,

Topic:

The Black Population in the Maghreb and the obstacles of Integrations: Algeria as a Model

Speaker:

Dr. Raed Bader

Summary:

The period of prohibiting slavery forms a crucial period in the integration of new societies to which they belong to.  However, to what extent can the Blacks in North Africa, Algeria in particular, form an identity of their own; or emerge as a part of the country’s’ identity which will shape starting from the year 1962 their new homeland. 

The abolition of slavery, has helped in the formation of a minority within the Algerian society. Where slaves were not considered (the moment they were brought) or Blacks (the moment they were freed later on) a part of the society they lived in.  Their relationship with the place was always associated with their master. There is no  doubt that the Algerian society, through its local, and foreigner “European” aspects , has played a role in the marginalizing Blacks felt in Algeria. This marginalization has continued throughout the French colonization period,  and throughout the  post slavery era. On the other hand, it did not end at this point, on the contrary the marginalization and exclusionism of Black Algerians has increased- probably unintentionally- during the national liberation and post independence period. 

This paper seeks to examine the extent to which post independence polices have succeeded in considering Blacks a part of Algeria’s identity, just like the Europeans- former settlers-  who choose Algeria as a country of their own under the authority of the Algerian state. This paper will also study the evolvement of the concept “Black” in north African societies during the occupation era, and how they were perceived after independence?

To what extend is the Black society responsible for the cocooning Blacks experienced before and after the Algerian emancipation? Wherein Blacks were residing in nearby areas from African origins,  while still remaining within the Algerian borders. They took the south of Algeria as a place of refuge for them, where coastal and northern areas in Algeria have witnessed a large scale of immigration towards southern Algeria. Was there a policy behind transferring Blacks towards remote areas in the South, or has this type of immigration appeared so as to preserve African identity in Algeria post to its independence?

What are the reasons that have led to making the integration of Blacks in the Algerian society so difficult, despite the fact that leaders of the national Algerian movement have stressed on equality and the notion of not discriminating amid Algerians regardless of their origin, color, or gender. Also there are many strict and implicit regulations to fight racism. Although officially there is no racism, no Black Algerian has ever been employed in high position jobs in the state, such as the position of a decision maker.

 

 Black minority and groups can be found in every Arab country and are considered a part of the demographic composition. But the question posed here is, to what extent do these Blacks form a part of the national identity of the country which they belong to, culturally, scientifically and athletically …etc; ever since some of the Maghreb states have considered “Blacks’ culture” as a part of the country’s folklore -such as Gnawa in Morocco and Algeria

Output:

 


 

2012PE0502
Brainstorming Session:

May 2, 2012

Topic:

Palestinians in Diaspora: Their Identity and Nationalism in Jordan

Speaker:

Dr. Aiko Nishikida

Summary:

Dr. Aiko Nishikida, Assistant Professor of Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, presented her research paper on Palestinians in Diaspora: Their Identity and Nationalism in Jordan, which is based on the field research she conducted  from 2003 to 2005 in Jordan and Palestine (the West Bank). She discussed the role of Palestinian refugees as actors, the issue of citizenship/Nationality and refugees, in addition to National identity in the Diaspora. She also presented an analysis about kinship network and identity of Palestinians in Jordan. On a collective level, she spoke of the Nakba as a collective experience and how it forms a memory of successive experience of deprivation, in addition to shared traditional Palestinian cultures (Turath) such as embroidery which represents Palestinian identity.

Output:

 

 


2012PE0514
Brainstorming Session:

May 14, 2012

Topic:

Temporalities at Allenby Bridge

Speaker:

Veronique Bontemps

Summary:

In this brainstorming session, Veronique Botemps highlighted the temporality imposed on Palestinians by the Israeli occupation as a colonial temporality, as it relies on a process of expropriation.  With taking the Allenby Bridge as a case study, Botemps emphasized that for the Palestinians, this bridge constitutes the only crossing point towards Jordan and the outside world and back. She also argues that the Allenby Bridge is the place where Palestinians experiment a specific temporal experience:  It is a piece of the Israeli system of occupation which not only fragments their perception of space, but also disrupts their perception of time. She analyses the spatial organization of the Bridge, which is a place to what she describes as a colonial temporal regime.

Output:

 


 

2012PE0426
Brainstorming Session:

April  26, 2012

Topic:

The Question of Identity of the Palestinian Citizens of Israel

Speaker:

Eva Oliveria

Summary:

In this brainstorming session, Eva Oliveria discussed the identity of the Internally displaced Palestinians in Israel. She argued that the policy of the State of Israel has worked throughout the years on oppressing Palestinian citizens in order to diminish Palestinian Identity. She claims that for the past sixty four years the state of Israel has been employing its racist policies against its Palestinian citizens who are treated and designated as second class citizens. She also explored the development of the situation of the Palestinian citizens of Israel and where they stand now, 64 years after the Nakba, and after 64 years of an oppressive policy that is based on inequality.

Output:

 


2012PE0405
Brainstorming Session:

April 05, 2012

Topic:

Doctoral thesis proposal in which he aims to examine the integration of the Palestinian camps in the surrounding urban environment

Speaker:

Sufyan Mokrani

Summary:

The study is a comparative one to see the differences between camps located in three different zones (zone A / zone B / zone C). Sufyan clarifies that he will compare each of Shu'fat camp (zone C), Jalazone camp (zone b) and Dheisheh camp (zone A) in terms of: First, spatial integration depending on the proximity and mobility to and from the neighboring cities. Second, socio-economic integration on aspects of education, employment and health. Finally, in terms of political integration, including political identity, opportunities for political participation and security. After that, there was a discussion with the audience (faculty members and staff of the Institute) who discussed a number of questions and important notes on the presented proposal.

Output:

 


 

2012PE0313
Brainstorming Session:

March 13, 2012

Topic:

The Persistence of Racial Segregation and Urban Apartheid in a post-“Jim Crow” America: The Case of Detroit, Michigan (1967-2012)

Speaker:

Thomas Abowd

Summary:

 

In this presentation, Thomas focused on questions of race, racism, and class oppression in Detroit, Michigan, perhaps America’s most segregated big city. How can legislation barring discrimination in housing and land policy still not provide the remedies for deep spatial and racial division in the US? Pierre Bourdieu and other anthropologists and sociologists have cited the school system as one of the most effective institutions in reproducing the class inequality. But what other forces and institutions contribute to “American Apartheid”? How has poverty been increasingly racialized in US cities and what has that meant for various ethnic and racial communities in Detroit?

Output:

 

 


 

 

2012PE0216
Brainstorming Session:

February 16, 2012

Topic:

Not Just A Soccer Game: Colonialism and Conflict among Palestinians in Israel.

Speaker:

Dr. Majid Shihade

Summary:

 

In his presentation, Dr. Majid discussed his book “Not Just A Soccer Game: Colonialism and Conflict among Palestinians in Israel.” The book aims, on the one hand, to contribute to the project of Arab/Palestinian intellectual decolonization, a project that is necessary for real economic, political, and social decolonization. On the other hand, the presentation offered a brief discussion of the event of the soccer game between two Palestinian villages, Kafr Yassif and Julis, which ended in a fight between the fans, resulting in the killing of two people, one from each village. Dr. Majid connected this incident with the question of communal conflict and settler colonialism.

Output:

 

 


 

 

2012PE0126
Brainstorming Session:

January 26, 2012

Topic:

Different Interpretation of the UN Bid: The Politician and the Intellectual: From a Life of Resistance to Negotiations The Crucial Factor: Discourse, Pattern of Production or Funding?”

Speaker:

Dr. Adel Samara

Summary:

 

which he talked about how Palestinians have shifted from the track of resistance to negotiations, with relying on the issue of political economy as a tool for analysis. Dr. Samara also discussed the dependency policy of deconstructing Economics, and the role of culture and of the intellectual in fighting the colonizer; along with analyzing the relationship between the intellectual and the politician to subordinate the intellectual to the authority. He Also referred to different categories of Palestinian intellectuals who have consented with the rule of self determination and the peace agreements. He also referred to the reasons which have supported  this transition such as, creating an atmosphere of consenting to agreements, financially depending on foreign aid, lacking developmental plans, accepting the advices of the World Bank, and the Americanization of lifestyle.

Output:

 

 


 

 

2012PE0112
Brainstorming Session:

January 12, 2012

Topic:

Palestinian Refugees, holders of Jordanian Nationality, Living in Inner-City Amman-Jordan: Exploring the Current Economic Opportunities

Speaker:

Oroub El-Abed

Summary:

 

In this brainstorming discussion, Oroub Al-Abed presented her research project which studies the dynamics of power that influenced the 'economic integration’ of Palestinian refugees in Arab host countries and the drastic change in economic opportunities they have been able to access since 1988. Almost sixty two years today after their dispossession, the 'economic integration’ of Palestinian refugees, as envisioned by the United Nations to settle the refugees in host countries, has not materialised. This work unfolds the factors that have impacted Palestinian refugees, particularly those living and seeking economic opportunities in inner city of Amman-Jordan since 1988, when major economic and political changes were taking place.

Output:

 

 


 

 

2011PE1208
Brainstorming Session:

December 8, 2011

Topic:

“Digitalizing Cultural Heritage”

Speaker:

Haythem Dieck

Summary:

 

Mr. Dieck gave a power point presentation on one of the most exciting topics today which falls within what is known as Digitalizing Cultural Heritage, which mainly depends on documenting cultural and heritgae materials (whether movies, pictures, papers, recording, collections) in a digitlaized style which is eventually uploaded on professional websites.  These materials can be found quickly and easily. One of the most well known sites addressing these topics is Michael: Multilingual Inventory of Culture Heritage in Europe, in addition to Europeana. Moreover, there are special collections in museums such as: the British museum which digitalized 1,993,003 materials out of 8 million.

Output:

 

 


 

 

2011PE1124
Brainstorming Session:

November 24, 2011

Topic:

Speaking of Statehood: Initial Findings Regarding the UN Bid in the Lives of Palestinian Lawyers

Speaker:

Dr. Michelle Bugis

Summary:

 

Dr. Michelle presented the results of her research which she carried out in Palestine over the last 2 months. During this period, she concentrated on interviews with various local actors engaged in the field of international law and especially those working directly and indirectly on the recent membership and statehood initiatives before the UN. She used these encounters to raise broader questions about the way in which professionals under occupation live a life through law and what statehood would mean for them in their work.

Output:

 

 


 

 

2011PE1103
Brainstorming Session:

November 3, 2011

Topic:

Socioeconomic Rights of Palestinian Refugees in Arab Countries

Speaker:

Dr. Asem Khalil

Summary:

 

Dr. Khalil discussed the possible impact of global crisis on the economic and social rights of Palestinian refugees in host Arab countries. He addressed the case of Palestinian refugees in the Arab states that host the majority of Palestinian refugees; that is, in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. He also shed light on the negative impact of the global crisis on Palestinian refugees, not only in terms of political enforcement but also in terms of their legal recognition. Moreover, he argues that the deterioration in the global economic context is no jus­tification for states – whatever their level of income – to compromise on their fundamental human rights obligations.

Output:

 

 


 

2011PE1020
Brainstorming Session:

October 20th, 2011

Topic:

The Palestinian Heritage: Official, Elite and Popular.

Speaker:

Dr. Roger Heacock

Summary:

 

Professor Heacock presented the different types of Palestinian cultural heritage which form a triangle that is: official, elite and popular. Official heritage is projected in the Palestinian  Authority architecture, monuments and poetry (photographic example: the plaza and tomb of the martyr Abu Ammar); elite heritage plunges one or two generations into the past to search for an authentically Palestinian, not simply globalized picture and project such as,  “the way we were” (photographic example: the Birzeit 2010 exhibition ) and “Ramallah, the fairest of them all?”); and the third unconsciously and effortlessly presents secular, age-old and yet living forms of ritual (photographic example: the Rantisi mechanized olive press (al-ma’sara) in old Ramallah). Through their various temporal perspectives (distant past, recent past and the present) all three testify in various ways to the continued presence of the occupation.

Output:

 

 


 

 

2011PE0922
Brainstorming Session:

September  22, 2011

Topic:

The Archive and the Challenges of Protecting the Palestinian Memory

Speaker:

Raed Eshnaiwer

Summary:

 

Mr. Eshnaiwer gave a theoretical introduction about the archive, based on Jacques Derrida approach in his book “Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression” in which he sees state archives as governmental components to control people. The researcher discussed two archival events which are establishing the Israeli national archive in 1949 and destroying the PLO research center in Beirut in 1982, pointing out to the Israeli unremitting attempts to destroy and to control the Palestinian memory, and their effort to build an Israeli memory on the ruins of the Palestinian one, seeking to impose their political control; Darrida says “There is no political power without control of the archive, if not of memory.” At the end, Mr. Eshnaiwer pointed out to the importance of the archive in the Palestinian case as a place to create knowledge and to formulate the national identity.

Output:

 

 


 

2011-PE0707
Brainstorming Session:

July 7, 2011

Topic:

 

Palestinian Refugees: displacement and reconciliation The need for a new approach
The Case of Jefna and Jalazoun Camp

Speaker:

 Lama Arda

Summary:

 

The paper demonstrates that to successfully reconcile refugees with the surrounding community, we first should work on a process of redesign and re-shape the relationships between refugees and non-refugees. As those two categories don’t stand on an equal footing; without mutual respectful relations, negative attitudes against refugees are existent due to misunderstanding, prejudice, inequality, misperception, stereotyping and racism. As a consequence, there are obvious differences and therefore a gap created between refugees and non-refugees especially those who live in the neighborhood.

The heart of this paper is genuinely Palestinian, as it brings along a real case which is Jalazoun as one of the refugee camps locates north of Ramallah and neighbors a village called Jefna. I took the decision to handle this case as I claim that there is a pressing need to pursue one forms of the reconciliations between Jalazoun camp and Jefna.

Output:

 


 

2011-PE0430
Brainstorming Session:

 

30 April 2011

 

Topic:

 

The series of colonial wars conducted by France after world war two (in Indochina to 1954, in Algeria from 1954 to 1962)

Speaker:

 

Mr. Pierre Joxef

 

Summary:

 

Mr. Joxe swiftly presented the series of colonial wars conducted by France after world war two (in Indochina to 1954, in Algeria from 1954 to 1962). And he expressed his opposition to those colonial wars, and the associated violence and torture such wars brought against civilians. Contrary to widespread expectations, the former colonies in Africa south of the Sahara and in the Arab world, did not bring democracy along with independence. On the contrary, the majority of these newly independent countries became corrupt military or civilian dictatorships. Though Mr. Joxe believes that the present Arab uprising is a very promising development

Output:

 

 


 

2010-PE1209
Brainstorming Session:

 

December 9, 2010

 

 

Topic:

 

 

Not expelling  the Arab residents of south-east Nazareth villages 1948

 

Speaker:

 

 

Muhsen Yusef

 

 

Summary:

 

 

Output:

 

Read  More


 

2010-PE1202
Brainstorming Session:

 

December 2, 2010

 

 

Topic:

 

 

Law and Society as an approach to studying forced migration

 

Speaker:

 

 

Jacques Commaille

 

Summary:

 

 

How can “law and society” as an approach serves to better understanding and dealing with refugees as an exception to the normal application of law.

In other words, how can “law and society” help normalize the exceptional case that represents refugee hood for the normal proceeding of law. Palestinian refugees are living under the state of exception in most host countries.

They were excluded from the regular application of international refugee law. They were excluded from the normal application of public law in host countries (applicable even on foreigners).

They were excluded from integrating with local communities by favoring their concentration in refugee camps as a symbol for their status, and as a sign for the determination to return.

In all those circumstances, Palestinian refugees were excluded from the regular application of law.

How can our unit better approach the issue of forced migration and refugees? And how can “law and society” be helpful in realizing this objective?

 

 

Output:

 

 


 

2010-PE1125
Brainstorming Session:

 

November 25, 2010

 

Topic:

 

 

Language Engineering and the Israeli Hebracization of the Palestinian Landscape: A Study in Palestinian Resistance Discourse (1997-2010)

 

 

Reporter:

 

 

Abdul-Rahim Al-Shaikh

 

Summary:

 

 

This study explores Israeli language engineering and the Hebracization of the landscape, with a special emphasis on the cultural and the legal discourse of Palestinian resistance from 1997 to 2010.

 

Because Palestine lives under a harsh colonial condition under Zionist occupation, the language of struggle and the struggle on language needs to be dealt with accordingly.

 

By understanding the dynamics used by Palestinians in terms of counter-language engineering, this study is both an analysis of the language used in the construction of the nation and the state, as well as the resistance to this form of colonial and state power.

 

The analysis of legal and cultural resistance regarding Israel’s Zionization of the Palestinian landscape is perceived as one of the most distinctive features of this counter-engineering.

 

The study consists of four complementary parts: Part I, focuses on language engineering and the Hebracization of the official and the legal discourse of the state; the geographic, demographic, and historiographic landscapes; and all the subjects of the public sphere in general.

 

Part II is concerned with understanding the major dynamics Palestinians developed in the legal and cultural fields between 1997-2010 in their confrontation with the apartheid Israeli regime.

 

This included refuting and rebuking Israeli laws and institutional measures that were created to undermine and desecrate the legal and cultural rights of the indigenous Palestinian community in the parts of historic Palestine in 1948.

 

This juridical resistance exposed the contradictions in the Israeli legal system and the racial overlapping between the different state apparatus jurisdictions and its implications on the Arabs and their basic rights.

 

Part III, investigates.

 

the impact of an absence of Palestinians from international bodies that monitor the national and international name committees and their politics of toponymy.

 

It deals with the possible scenarios of the mapping of “Greater Israel” and “Lesser Palestine” in the light of this absence.

 

Part IV, delves through the institutionalized racism of the Israeli state that is antagonistic to Arabs and their language.

 

In terms of methodology and sources, this study examines the daily work of several institutions that collaborated in their work to resist the Hebracization of Palestine.

 

By mapping this genealogy of resistance, this study highlights the work of various institutions including: Adalah-The Legal Center for the Rights of the Arab Minority in Israel (in Haifa), Clinic for the Rights of the Palestinian-Arab Minority at the School of Law at Haifa University; The Association for Civil Rights in Israel (in Jerusalem); The Arab Language Academy (in Haifa), The Arab Cultural Association (in Nazareth); and Ibn Khaldun-The Arab Association of Research and Development (in Tamrah).

 

 

Output:

 

 

 


 

 

2010-PE1028
Brainstorming Session:

 

October 28, 2010

 

Topic:

 

 

A Review of UNRWA Research needs

 

Reporter:

 

 

Asem Khalil

 

Summary:

 

 

 

Output:

 

 


 

2010-PE1021
Brainstorming Session: 

 

October 21, 2010

 

Topic:

 

 

Palestinian Migrants in Ramallah

 

Reporter:

 

 

Asem Khalil

 

Summary:

 

 

Palestinian Migrants in Ramallah, by: Dr. Majid Shihade – Identity, Conflict, Modernity, and Anthropology of knowledge 

 

The research paper looks into the situation of Palestinian migrants in the Ramallah area. It will examine the question of Palestinians who migrate to the Ramallah area for work, and what issues they face here, and how would this research complicate further the question of the Palestinian migration and refugees.

 

The paper will look into the changes that have impacted the Ramallah area since the 1990s, and how these changes have impacted Palestinian migrants who came to the Ramallah area to work

 

Output:

 

 


 

2010-PE1014
Brainstorming Session: 

 

October 14, 2010

 

Topic:

 

 

Civil Rights of Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon

 

Reporter:

 

 

Roger Heacock

 

Summary:

 

 

The main points of the presentation, in reaction to the article in Majallat Al-Derasat Al-Falasteenya (2010, pp. 30-43) on Civil Rights of Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon, for Sari Hanafi. Here are some of the points that were raised: 

 

-  As can be expected, there are significant differences of discourse and ethos in the Palestinian community in Lebanon and the West Bank, notably the hegemony of the PA and Fatah on the one hand, which actively marginalizes all other voices (especially of course those of Hamas) and the continuation of a certain if very abstract pluralism in Lebanon, with all of the various groups expressing themselves freely, and engaging in a freewheeling type of alliance politics.

 

-  The case at hand, the promulgation of amendments to labor laws regarding Palestinian in Lebanon, illustrates the extent to which advocacy does or does not contribute (based on this particular case) to the legislative process.

 

- The attempt by UNRWA in this instance to put into practice their rather new policy of reaching out to the Palestinian 'grassroots’.

 

-  The significance of the long, complicated and differentiated history of relations between Palestinians and (different categories of) Lebanese.

 

-  The issue of funding (particularly foreign funding) of advocacy and of those who participate in it.

 

- The undeniable fact that the entire issue and process finally improved the ways in which data were gathered and presented.

 

- The need to recognize differences between types of differing advocacy groups and how, as this process moved along, they may have contradictory rather than complementary effects.

 

- The 17 June march itself, and how it was poorly attended despite all of the hype (3000 people actually stayed to listen to the speeches, although perhaps three times as many people participated in the march, according to S. Hanafi).

 

- The contradictions between the PLO-aligned group and that of the opposition (the tahaluf).

 

- The fact that the final breakdown, when the vote actually occurred, was a purely sectarian one (Muslims vs. Christians, regardless of party affiliations).

 

- The question as to whether advocacy contributed to the amended law, as S. Hanafi suggests (based on the above, probably not).

 

- The conclusion that the attempt to put experts (“technocrats”) to the fore in order to avoid splits led here to political disengagement by the parties, who couldn’t see what was in it for them.

 

- More broadly, the hypothesis that it is a mistake ever to separate human rights (their objectives, their law, their practices) from politics.

These must be wedded or the human rights agenda will be unworkable.

 

-The conclusion that either a mass movement gets rid of intermediaries entirely (as in the first and second intifadas and voter decision in the 2005 and 2006 elections, or one should never fuse advocacy and participation of the whole through intermediary bodies: they compete or collapse.

The conclusion that the example at hand probably didn’t advance the cause of labor regime change (it was a legislative process which resulted in the law, whatever one may think of it).

 

Output:

 

 


 

2010-PE1004
Brainstorming Session: 

 

October 4, 2010

 

Topic:

 

 

IDRC Policies and Projects on Refugees

 

Reporter:

 

 

Roula El-Rifai

 

Summary:

 

 

Roula El-Rifai a Senior Program Specialist, Middle East Unit at the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) presented an overview of the IDRC focus on Palestinian Refugees and the Middle East peace process. She mentioned the importance of policy papers versus research projects.

 

She further stated that the key research projects are concentrated on compensation, absorption of Palestinian refugees and public opinion.

 

The IDRC is dealing with Palestinian refugees issue on the basis of four options in combination: integration in the host states, resettlement in third countries, return to Israel and return to a prospective Palestinian state.

 

In addition to that, compensation she said, does not necessarily prejudice the right of return.

 

She also illustrated the new IDRC book consisting of 14 chapters including topics on typology of compensation, gender aspects of migration and internally displaced people in Israel.

 

Output:

 

 

 


2010-PE0916
Brainstorming Session: 

 September 16, 2010

 

Topic:

 

 

New Grounds for Invoking Refugee Status

 

Reporter:

 

 

Basheer Al-Zoughbi

 

Summary:

 

 

The five grounds for persecution or fear of persecution as stated in Article 1A of the 1951 Geneva Convention are 'race, religion, nationality, and membership of a particular social group or political group.’ The 1951 Refugee Convention grounds of '...race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion' are certainly not an exhaustive list for invoking refugee status as proved by the subsequent developments and codification of international refugee law.

 

Other grounds that qualify for invoking refugee law are gender-based persecution and persecution based upon draft evading subject as ever to fulfilling certain conditions.

 

These few paragraphs examine the latter under international law.

 

Output:

 

 


 

2010-PE0902
Brainstorming Session: 

 

September 2, 2010

 

Topic:

 

 

Palestinian refugees in Lebanon following legislative amendments in August 2010

 

Reporter:

 

 

Yasser Darwish

 

Summary:

 

 

Output:

 

An article published in daily newspaper, Al-Ayyam on September 19, 2010. Read article

 

 

 

 

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